Lost Pet

Losing a pet can be distressing. But don’t lose heart. Call your local police department to report your pet lost. Don't forget to call the shelter and fill out a lost report with us so we can get ahold of you if your pet does come in. Stay calm and follow the steps listed below to help you find your pet.

  • Post Signs! Click here to download a free poster you can use to alert people to be on the lookout for your pet. Place copies of the poster within a twenty block radius of where your pet was lost. Put them up on local bulletin boards, in grocery stores and discount department stores.
  • Conduct A Search! Talk to your neighbors, especially the children who play in the neighborhood. Go door to door. Leave an index card with your name, address, telephone number and a complete description of your pet at each home. Search in the evenings when it’s quiet. Call or whistle. If your pet is injured or frightened, he may be hiding. Drive slowly around your neighborhood; sometimes a dog will recognize the sound of your car. Do keep in mind that cats sometimes climb into cars and are transported miles away before jumping out.
  • Visit Shelters! Visit the Lewis Clark Animal Shelter at 6 Shelter Road. You must go in person because only you can identify your pet. Look through all of the kennels and ask to see any quarantined animals. Be sure to go every day. The shelter holds stray pets for 5 days. After that, they become available for adoption. Leave a written report at the Animal Shelter for the bulletin board. Your pet may not be found for several weeks.

How to fill in the poster

Everyone should have recent pictures of their pets. If you don’t have a photo, try to get a picture from a breed book to give people a rough idea of what your pet looks like.

If your pet is an unusual breed, or is a mutt, you should write the breed the animal looks like most (e.g. looks like a Lab-type dog, looks like short hair Siamese). Never write “mutt” or “mongrel” for a dog. Ordinary cats can be described best as “domestic short hair”, “domestic medium hair”, etc. Only the main colors should be included. Don’t try to be too descriptive; you want anyone who thinks they may have seen your pet to call you.
Fill in your name and phone number on each of the small tabs at the bottom of the poster. If you don’t have an answering machine, give a home and work number or list hours that you will be home, so the caller will be sure to reach you. Cut the tabs along the lines provided, so that if someone has seen your pet, he or she can easily tear off the tab with your name and number.

If someone calls about your pet

Have specific details in mind to ask a caller that will positively identify your pet. Take someone with you when you meet the caller to pick up your lost pet. Never go into a stranger’s home alone. If you must go alone, arrange to meet the caller in their front yard or a public place.

When you locate your pet

Call the Lewis Clark Animal Shelter and arrange to have a microchip implanted just under your pets skin for permanent identification. Law enforcement, Animal Control, Animal Shelters and most veterinarians have microchip scanners. This inexpensive, painless ID is responsible for the safe return of thousands of pets every year.